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  • Writer's pictureRachel Scott

Proving Negligence in Slip and Fall Cases: A Guide for Washington State Residents

Slip and fall accidents are common occurrences, and they can happen to anyone, anywhere, and at any time. These accidents can be caused by a variety of factors, such as wet floors, uneven surfaces, or poorly maintained properties. In Seattle, slip and fall accidents are a major cause of injuries, medical expenses, lost wages, and emotional trauma. They can often lead to legal disputes between injured parties and property owners.





If you've suffered a slip and fall accident in Seattle, you may be entitled to compensation, but you will have to prove that the property owner was negligent. In this article, we'll discuss the legal requirements for proving negligence in a slip and fall case, as well as common defenses used by property owners.


Understanding Negligence

Negligence is a legal term that refers to a person or entity's failure to act with reasonable care, resulting in harm or injury to another person. In the case of slip and fall accidents, negligence typically refers to a property owner's failure to maintain their property in a safe condition. To prove negligence, you must demonstrate the following four elements:

  1. Duty of Care - The property owner had a legal duty to provide a safe environment for visitors, guests, or customers.

  2. Breach of Duty - The property owner failed to meet the duty of care, either by creating a dangerous condition or failing to correct a known hazard.

  3. Causation - The dangerous condition caused your slip and fall accident, and the injury you suffered was a direct result of the property owner's breach of duty.

  4. Damages - You suffered actual damages as a result of the accident, including medical expenses, lost wages, and pain and suffering. (Source: Elements of a Negligence Case)


Proving Negligence in Slip and Fall Cases

Proving negligence in slip and fall cases can be challenging, as property owners will often fight tooth and nail to avoid liability. To prove negligence, you must gather evidence that demonstrates the property owner's breach of duty. This evidence might include:

  1. Incident Report - If you fall in a store or other commercial establishment, you should immediately report the accident to the manager or property owner. They should create an incident report, which you should request a copy of.

  2. Witness Statements - If anyone witnessed your fall, ask them to provide a statement about what they saw. These statements can be powerful evidence in court.

  3. Medical Records - If you sought medical treatment after your accident, you should keep detailed records of your injuries and treatment. These records can help establish the extent of your damages.

  4. Photographs and Video - If possible, take photographs or videos of the area where you fell, including any hazards that contributed to your accident.


Common Defenses Used by Property Owners

In slip and fall cases, property owners may use a variety of defenses to avoid liability. Some of the most common defenses include:

  1. Open and Obvious - Property owners may argue that the hazard that caused your fall was open and obvious, and therefore, you should have seen and avoided it.

  2. Comparative Negligence - Property owners may argue that you were partially responsible for your accident because you were not paying attention or were wearing inappropriate footwear.

  3. Lack of Notice - Property owners may argue that they did not have notice of the hazard, meaning they did not know about it or did not have enough time to correct it.


More on Comparative Negligence

In Washington State, comparative negligence is a legal principle used to determine how much compensation a plaintiff should receive for their injuries if they are partially at fault for the accident that caused them. Comparative negligence acknowledges that, in some cases, both the plaintiff and the defendant may have contributed to the accident. In such cases, the damages awarded to the plaintiff are reduced in proportion to their degree of fault (RCW 4.22.005).


How It Works

To understand how comparative negligence works, let's consider an example. Imagine that a driver runs a red light and hits a pedestrian who was jaywalking. If the pedestrian is found to be 25% at fault for the accident because they were not using a crosswalk, and the driver is found to be 75% at fault because they ran a red light, the damages the pedestrian is entitled to will be reduced by 25%.


Pertaining to Slip and Fall Accidents and Premises Liability

Slip and fall accidents are a common type of personal injury claim that often involves premises liability. Property owners have a legal responsibility to maintain their premises in a reasonably safe condition and warn visitors of any hazards that cannot be promptly fixed. If a visitor slips and falls on a wet floor, for example, the property owner may be held liable if they failed to clean up the spill or failed to warn visitors of the hazard.


However, in some cases, the injured person may also be partially at fault for the accident. For example, if a visitor is walking on a clearly marked wet floor despite seeing a "caution wet floor" sign, they may be found to be partially at fault for their injuries. In such cases, comparative negligence may apply, and the damages awarded to the plaintiff will be reduced in proportion to their degree of fault.


Working with a Personal Injury Lawyer

Proving negligence in slip and fall cases can be complicated, and property owners will often fight tooth and nail to avoid liability. This is why it is essential to work with a personal injury lawyer who has experience in slip and fall cases. A lawyer can help you gather evidence, build

a strong case, and negotiate a fair settlement or represent you in court.


At Scott & Scott, PLLC, our experienced personal injury lawyers have helped many clients in Washington State and the Seattle area who have suffered slip and fall accidents. We understand the legal requirements for proving negligence, and we know how to counter the common defenses used by property owners. Our team can assist you in every step of your case, from investigating the accident to negotiating with insurance companies and representing you in court if necessary. Call us today at (206) 622-2200.


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